Saturday, December 5, 2009

Contact Us!

Want to learn more about the Pickle Project or share your stories and pictures of foodways in Ukraine?  We're particularly interesting in hearing about places worth visiting and people worth meeting--and seeing historic family photos of food.   So get in touch with us here by posting a comment.

45 comments:

  1. Great idea. am sharing your blog with others here in Ukraine that will be interested...
    Linda
    L'viv

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  2. Hi Linda,
    Thanks for connecting us to the cultural community in L'viv!

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  3. Hello Linda and Sarah. I can relate to the focus of your blog and will follow your posts with interest.

    I would like to know if you can expand on something I read in Imperial and Soviet Russia: Power, Privildege and the Challenge of Modernity, by David Christian. It has to do with the Potato riots in Vyatka province, 1842.

    Before I give more details, I will acknowledge that Vyatka province (now KIROV OBLAST) is some way from Ukraine. However, I think it is safe to say that that culturally, there would probably be striking similarities between this event and what could have happened in the Ukraine.

    In his discussion of peasant disturbances in the 1840s, Christian quotes a 1939 document which says that 300 soldiers were brought into Bykovskeo village on July 12 to calm 600 unarmed peasants who "unanimously declared that potatoes were no good for them" (p.75). It is not explained why, but the report goes on to say that the peasants made it clear that they would rather die than plant potatoes!?

    In the end, the army forced some villagers to plant the potatoes, arrested the instigators, whipped a handful of them, and sent the others home. But the peasants' refrain was "Let them sow! We will just throw them out."

    This came as a surprise to me given how important potatoes were to my Ukrainian-Canadian ancestors and relatives. I was left wondering, what was it that the peasants wanted to plant instead? Why did the government want so badly for the peasants to eat potatoes?

    It reminded me of another displacement, from using millet to using rice in making cabbage rolls. When I was growing up in Canada in the sixties and seventies, when babas made cabbage rolls they used rice, no questions asked. I later found out that previously they had used buckwheat or millet. I know that rice, like sugar, was an important part of creating commodities and the world food market(the opposite of sustainability). These were among the only things that early eastern European settlers in Canada would purchase (rice and sugar). The rest they could grow themselves. These were the foodstuffs which began the draw those who were part of a sustainable subsistence peasant economy into the growth-driven consumer economy.

    So, I am wondering what the story is behind the potatoes. Any ideas??

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  4. Thank you for your thoughtful comment and inquiry, Don.

    You raise an interesting question about the potatoes because potatoes are such a critical staple in Slavic fair. Neither of us has yet(!) read Christian’s book but we are very interested in the progression of crop selection over Ukraine’s history and related developments in global commodity availability. As our research continues, we will explore opportunities to learn more about this topic and share insights we discover.

    We also appreciate your observations about the transition in grains in traditional Ukrainian dishes. While I have occasionally seen holobsi filled with kasha (buckwheat), I have also wondered how and why rice was incorporated into Ukrainian cuisine. Similar to your experiences, during last year’s rapid and dramatic economic decline, I noticed that many Ukrainian families were buying and storing two key items in large quantities: sugar and rice. And, indeed, I was told that these were items expected to be scarce in the future and could not be produced locally. As you suggest and draw from your own experience, these kinds of practices do speak to household sufficiency strategies.

    Thank you, again, for your interest and insights! (Sorry for the delayed response; we were both traveling and away from the computer).

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  5. Privet, Linda & Sarah,

    I'm an Italian man, so I LOVE to eat, & also an avid fan of Ukraina & all it's wonderful people! I'm fascinated by all that you both do there, & enjoyed your story about the Galushka monument! I've a recent photo of myself there in Poltava, crouching down upon this very monument, holding onto it's rather large spoon! I'd like to share this photo with you if you'd like? Let me know how to send it?

    I plan to return to Kiev soon, on my way to Simferopol, into the arms of a truly amazing woman I've not yet met, but have been emailing for several years now! I plan to stay for awhile, so if there's any way I can assist you in your efforts while there, I'd certainly consider any suggestions? I now live in South Louisiana, but this oil mess here is driving me away!!

    Looking forward to meeting you both soon :) Spacebo!

    Da Svidanya! DARRENCAT

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  6. related topic: pictures of Russian traditional food: http://www.savok.name/200-food.html

    despite some dishes like pancakes, patties, borsht, kasha and others are common with Ukrainian quisine, one can see obvious difference in presentation. pictures of traditional Russian food are usually overloaded with ornamental decorations and specky small details

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  7. hey pickle fans,
    what a neat project. i was born and spent a part of my childhood in kiev. this blog is very near and dear to my heart/stomach. i'll be following this blog now that i've found it and hope to discover traditional food along with you!

    i'd love to see some stuff on other pickled goods like, kapusta (cabbage). or you could explore vegetarianism in traditional cuisine (difficult but not impossible! tolstoy!)or, even further the divisions and crossovers from ukranian and jewish-ukranian foods!

    ah! sorry. certainly don't mean to push in any one direction, this is just where my interests are :)

    enjoy the tastings!

    Laura

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  8. Hi Laura--

    Thanks so much for reading and commenting--we hope to continue exploring all sorts of Ukrainian food--and if you'd like to do a guest post about any of the topics you're particularly interested in (or your childhood food memories from Kyiv) we'd love to have you!

    Keep in touch!

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  9. hello ladies
    thank you for this wonderful blog
    a dutch friend of mine sent me the link today
    i am also a fulbright scholar and i am STILL here in ukraine, living in a small village near Uman

    i have been here for more than four and a half years and i have learned from my neighbors how to farm and preserve
    you are welcome to come and visit anytime
    i have a cellar full of goodies!
    and today spent the better part of the day burning weeds and eating my own homegrown watermelon!

    naomi

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  10. Naomi--

    Thanks so much--actually we've met, but in a big group when you showed your film at the Ya Gallery in spring 2009. Didn't know you were still there...and we may take you up on that visit offer! And, we'd love a guest post and or/photos--how about your root cellar?

    I'll be back in Ukraine in early October, but just for 10 days in Kyiv on another project...

    And the Dutch friend who shared the blog--is he/she the ones who are now farming in Ukraine? (I've heard of this from my Dutch friends in Kyiv)....

    Small world and thanks SO much for getting in touch.

    Linda

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  11. linda hello
    thank you for your note
    i am sorry that i did not remember meeting
    yes....i am still here
    bought a house, land, root cellar
    my dutch friend is florence tonk
    she has just completed a novel set in a ukrainian village

    it will be published in dutch and perhaps ukrainian, neither of which i can really read
    but i have read some of her poetry and it is fantastic

    where are you now?
    i leave for a few months in november
    but i will surely send you a foto of my root cellar
    i will be back in the spring to plant again
    and you will always be a welcome guests
    we are trying to start an artist residency program here called Echo Luna.

    if you want to have a more private exchange
    i am
    naomiuman@gmail.com

    so nice to be in touch!

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  12. Greetings folks--

    My wife and I are organic farmers in Pennsylvania (USA), and are in the process of adopting from Ukraine. We are hoping we will have our official invitation from the government sometime in late November or early December. If that is our schedule, I would be interested in knowing if there are any active markets through the winter. We wil spend 1-3 days in Kiev, and the remainder of our trip will be spent in Krivvy Rogg (uncertain of spelling). If by chance we are able to do some visiting while in country, we would love to spend some time with other small scale farmer's across the globe!

    Thanks!

    Eric Noel
    sales@edenvieworganics.com

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  13. Hi Eric--

    Thanks for the comment and finding us--markets happen all year round in Ukraine, but they're pretty different from what we think of as farmers markets here in the US. But, if you're in Kyiv, check out two markets: Bessarabka, which is right in the city center and the market at Lukyanivivska metro stop on the green line, one stop up from Golden Gate (Zoloti Vorota). The first feels more for tourists, the second where Kyivians shop. And you'll find markets in Kirvy Rog as well--just ask around. You really see seasonal food here--so you'll be seeing pickles, cabbage, potatoes, etc. Good luck--and if you find you're interested in sharing a guest blog post from your perspective as small farmers here about what you find there, let us know!
    Linda

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  14. Very nice blog! I hope you don't mind if I add you to my blogroll.
    --
    Florian

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  15. Thanks Florian--love to be listed on your blogroll and will now keep up with yours. We'd appreciate any boost you could give us towards our fundraising effort on Kickstarter--check it out and consider a pledge--we bet you'd love a T-shirt! http://kck.st/gCeJrj
    Linda

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  16. Linda and Sarah,
    I am a law professor (ag & food law) and direct the only US LLM Program in Ag & Food Law. My husband & law prof colleague is Christopher Kelley, a Fulbright Scholar who previously taught in Ukraine. He passed on an email from you. Congratulations on your project! I just became a supporter on kickstart, posted a blog on your efforts (aglawllm.blogspot.com), tweeted about you, and now follow you. Also posted on the community foods listserv out of Tufts. I am hoping I can help you to make your goal! Good luck to you - great project!

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  17. Hi Susan--
    Thank you so much. One thing we've absolutely learned in our Kickstarter effort is how great connections often turn up in the most unexpected ways--such as an email passed along. We greatly appreciate your pledge, your list serv posting, and the wonderful blog entry. We're happy to meet you!
    Linda

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  18. Sarah I am not sure how I found your project, but somehow I ended up on your kickstarter page and I was so excited to see that it was you! Congratulations on reaching your fund raising goals, and than you for the introduction to kickstarter.

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  19. Great to hear from you, Jessica! I am so glad you found us on Kickstarter and made the connection! We are delighted by our Kickstarter experience and would be glad to chat with you, if you are interested. Linda has been sharing Kickstarter insights along the way on her wonderful blog: http://uncatalogedmuseum.blogspot.com/. So, that is a good place to learn more too!

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  20. hey guys, such an unexpected and lovely find your blog is!

    I am myself half Ukrainian, long-term-stuck in London. I write about food (www.gastronomicalme.com)and am currently studying Anthropology of Food at SOAS. I'm tentatively considering doing my research on...salo, so would love to have a (electronic!) chat with you. couldn't find your email here, so perhaps drop me a line (see my site). spasibo!

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  21. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  22. Hey Linda and Sarah,

    I love your work! I was a Fulbrighter in Ukraine 2007-2008 and currently study international relations, migration, food and agriculture as part of my graduate studies in Boston. Not really much of a question, but this is a really cool site. Shaslivo!

    Elise Garvey

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  23. Forgot to mention I was linked to the site through the article in the State Alumni Newsletter. :-)

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  24. Thanks Elyse--and nice to know that the state alumni newsletter reached some people. We met, I think, when you spoke at a Fulbright Orientation--I think the same year Sarah and I did as returning Fulbrighters as well--and actually that's when the Pickle Project began to hatch. I'll be back in Kyiv in March speaking at a conference and I'm also working with Olga Trusova, who worked on trafficking issues on turning her comic book into an outdoor exhibit in Kyiv. Thanks so much--and should you have photos, stories, or an interest in a guest blog post, please let us know.
    Linda

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  25. Hi Linda,

    Yes I have seen your blog before and its really great. Its nice to see something so devoted to one aspect of Ukrainian food culture. I love to take pictures of food too and I would be glad to share them with you.

    Take care and perhaps our paths will cross one day here.

    Laura Chaath
    Peace Corps Volunteer
    laurachaath@gmail.com

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  26. Thanks for your post and offer to share food photos and stories with the Pickle Project, Laura!

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  27. This refers to your entry from early April where you write "Zytniy Rynok (market), near Palats Ukraina." You got it right in the title,the market near Palats Ukraina is Volodymyrs'ky. Zytniy Rynok is in Podil--right near a restaurant I enjoyed--Harbuzyk. I loved their home brewed kvas.

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  28. Hi Roma--
    Thanks for the correction--I shouldn't write blog posts when tired! Have gone back and made the correction--I had visited both markets that week. And good to know about another restaurant.
    Linda

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  29. Hello, Linda and Sarah,

    What a very cool project. As a home gardener, foodie, and partially Ukrainian by ancestry, it's great to see how these things come together. I just saw that you're doing a talk in West Kortright, NY, this August. Could we lure you to Ithaca for a similar talk? The sustainability/home food production community here is strong, and I'm sure the talk would draw a crowd. Do let me know.

    Cheers,
    Karen
    karen.edelstein@gmail.com

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  30. Hi. I just came across your very interesting and well-written blog. I'm an editor and am not making a political statement by any means, but in your item "Lunch, Soviet-Style" you refer to the Soviet Union as if it was still a country ("These canteens--or cafeterias--still exist across the Soviet Union...). This is simply not the case and a simple "former" or "ex-" would have done the trick. Otherwise, keep up the very good work.

    Richard
    New York

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  31. Oh, absolutely right Richard--will make the correction right now. As it's clear every day, the ghosts of the Soviet Union linger, but Ukraine is very much an independent nation!

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  32. Hi everyone! Thought you might be interested in this video posted as part of the Window on America project's work at the Kirovograd Library. This video has to do with how village growers of tomatoes in Ternopil have increased their knowledge of agriculture by use of the internet with the result being more scientific growth practices and higher yields.

    http://library.kr.ua/woa/prezent_e.html

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  33. I forgot to mention in the previous post that the video's title is "Leap Forward" - it's part way down the page.

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  34. Thanks, Kim, for sharing this interesting video link! (There are actually a number of informative videos on this page.)

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  35. Sarah and Linda,

    I am currently living in Kyiv as a Jewish Service Corp Volunteer. I am very interested in food, food production, sustainability, and just about all of the topics you touch on in your blog. I am looking to do research and learning here, and would love to speak with either of you, or even just get some direction about getting plugged into the food/foodie community here. I am bursting with ideas and enthusiasm and your blog is such a beacon of excitement. Please let me know if there is a way we could be in contact.
    Thanks and really hoping to get in touch!
    Amy

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  36. Hi Sarah/Linda,

    I am a Canadian living in DC with my husband. His grandmother was Ukrainian and so he is 1/4 Ukrainian and we celebrate Ukrainian Christmas. I am a PhD student in sociology and a food and features writer for Ottawa Magazine and I would love to write something about your project for a US publication.

    Please get in touch if you want to chat, especially if either of you are coming to DC. We would love to make you dinner and show you Adam's Babcia's old Ukrainian cookbook and her framed Easter egg and mini rushnyk. We would love to show you the rushnyk we received from Babcia for our wedding too. It was tied around a loaf of paska made by Adam's mother.

    I've written about food and foodways and presented a paper at the ASFS conference. I was a founding member of the Canadian version (CAFS) too.

    Hope to meet you and talk about all kinds of delicious food!

    Riva (rsoucieatgmaildotcom)

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  37. Hi Riva--

    Sorry to be a slow responder...too much travel for both Sarah and I. We'd love to have you write an article about us! Plans for DC travel up in the air, but perhaps we could chat by phone--let me know what you think.
    Linda

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  38. Hi Linda and Sarah,

    My mom and I were happy supporters of the Pickle Project on Kickstarter. We'll both be in the New York area over President's Day weekend, and wondered if it might be possible to meet up with you? We would love to hear more about the project so far, as well as where you are headed next. Our family is from the Ukraine, admittedly a couple generations back, but still we are avid DIYers in the kitchen and want to learn more about that country's traditional foodways. We hope to take a food-centric trip to the Ukraine in the near future and would love to know what advice you might have. If you have time to get together, please let us know.

    Thank you, Kristina Johnson
    (kristina.10.johnson@gmail.com)

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  39. Greetings and kudos!

    I'm Laura Silver, knish researcher, hello.
    I think I met you in Molly O'Neill's food writing class.
    I wonder if you have any experience with Ukrainian knysh... historically or in modern-day Ukraine. I think it's used for Christmas and for mourning... as per several informants...

    Any leads welcomed.

    My best
    Laura
    knish@me.com

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  40. Hello Linda and Sarah,
    My name is Anna, I am a Ukrainian philology student at Kyiv-Mohyla academy. I've always liked everything concerning food, cuisine as a culture and an essential part of national identity. I adore travelling too.
    And once, some weeks ago, I got an idea which sounded genius - to make a trip all over Ukraine to meet the people and learn about our cuisine in its diversity, to get recipes, make photos, publish them somehow... Now I've decided to do it in June. I've started searching if somebody did such thing to see how to do it and I found you!!!
    Your blog and work are fascinating! It is so great people outside Ukraine get interested in our cuisine! I would like to communicate with you via e-mail as I have some questions to which you may have answers as you are doing the same I would love to accomplish this summer. Like: how to find people? where to stay?
    Oh, I am so excited!
    I hope you will write me back.
    Sincerely Yours,
    Anna
    anya.ohoiko(at)gmail.com

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  41. Hi!

    I just came across your blog while finding recipes from eastern Europe. I read your passion for food. I love your blog from the first time I saw it! I've been visiting blogs everyday for I am always up for new and refreshing dishes for my small business. Recently, I've been engrossed in looking for recipes from Europe to incorporate in my business.


    By the way, I have found a cooking competition that I think you might get interested in. It's about cooking your national dish. The stake? A chance to win an Ipad mini or money! I think you will a perfect fit to represent your country! This is also a great way to introduce Ukrainians cuisine to the world! =)

    Here's the link: https://www.facebook.com/IngredientMatcher
    http://www.slideshare.net/IngredientMatcher/competition-from-ingredient-matcher-cook-your-national-dish-25773568

    I hope to see you in the competition. I think you can make it! *:) happy


    Regards,

    Maan

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  42. Hi there I am planning a trip to Ukraine/US to research fermenting traditions - are you still active and engaged in fermenting? Be great to make contact.

    Katie

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    1. Hi Katie--yes, we're still active, and actually I'm in Ukraine right now for a few weeks. Would love to hear more about your interests there--and the US as well!

      Delete

  43. Hi,
    I'm following up on an email I sent a few weeks back about guest posting for your website, ,
    I work for Modernize.com, and we've written for some pretty cool sites like The Huffington Post, About.com and Apartment Therapy and I think we can provide some pretty awesome content for your readers.
    Here are a couple examples of recent articles our writers have written:
    Ways to Save Money on Your Electric Bill - http://www.thefrugalcoupleblog.com/2014/12/ways-to-save-money-on-your-electric.html
    Easy Ideas for Eco-Friendly Décor - http://www.greenbrideguide.com/blog/4-easy-ideas-eco-friendly-wedding-decor
    Guest posting is a great way for us to expand our audience and an easy way for you to get content for your site. Let me know if you're interested and we can get started right away!
    Thanks!
    Kelsey

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  44. Hi,
    I'm following up on an email I sent a few weeks back about guest posting for your website, ,
    I work for Modernize.com, and we've written for some pretty cool sites like The Huffington Post, About.com and Apartment Therapy and I think we can provide some pretty awesome content for your readers.
    Here are a couple examples of recent articles our writers have written:
    Ways to Save Money on Your Electric Bill - http://www.thefrugalcoupleblog.com/2014/12/ways-to-save-money-on-your-electric.html
    Easy Ideas for Eco-Friendly Décor - http://www.greenbrideguide.com/blog/4-easy-ideas-eco-friendly-wedding-decor
    Guest posting is a great way for us to expand our audience and an easy way for you to get content for your site. Let me know if you're interested and we can get started right away!
    Thanks!
    Kelsey

    ReplyDelete